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Author Topic: Acetone - when to use?  (Read 11876 times)

polynana

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2012, 08:37:14 AM »
I think being alcohol inks you can use any alcohol sucessfully as a solvent for them.

Emma

I used brandy once  ;)
As I don't drink at all it smelt awful.

ejralph

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2012, 08:44:37 AM »
vodka is often used as it supposedly doesn't have a smell, although I would beg to differ there!

I don't drink either so all alcohols smell pretty yuck to me.

Emma
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ShawnGCreations

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2012, 11:49:19 AM »
I'm a bit late on this. In my defense I only just joined. I tried a few things like acetone. I've tried turpentine and acetone. It's really best for smoothing seems and joins. Also if you don't have liquid clay you can rub some on and it'll help bond joins throughout and not just the edges.

The main drawback was that if you're not careful it can make the clay a bit hard to work with. It seems too harsh.
I eventually tried rubbing alcohol which was less harsh but the best so far has been mineral oil. I honestly just use baby oil for that now.

Although if you're looking to avoid fingerprints then surgical gloves work but get sweaty. Cornstarch is also pretty good. I've just gotten into the habit of working out the prints as I work, as much as I can.
Feel free to visit http://shawngcreations.co.za/ if you'd like to see what I do.

MelMcG

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2012, 08:42:21 AM »
Thanks for all that info Shawn.

Mel  :)

Carrie

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2012, 03:34:09 PM »
I saw a free tutorial  where acetone aka nail varnish remover was used on baked black clay to give a very matt, velvety texture.  Acetone fumes are very bad for you, however.  I think it's a stronger solvent than alcohol.

ShawnGCreations

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2012, 04:14:35 PM »
Thanks for all that info Shawn.

Mel  :)

My pleasure.
I forgot to mention that I also use mineral oil when I need to bond unbaked clay to a baked piece. I never could get the seems to smooth enough, and usually the joint is weak.
This way you get a better bond and smoother seams.
Feel free to visit http://shawngcreations.co.za/ if you'd like to see what I do.

Carrie

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2012, 07:49:40 PM »
I use baby oil - mineral oil - sometimes, to soften too-hard clay - I guess that would be why you get such a nice smooth seam when you use it to join baked to unbaked - softening the edges of the unbaked part  :)  Good thinking!!

Bonipie

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2012, 04:49:37 AM »
Wow, I did not know you could use baby oil to bond clay!  I'll have to try that.  Actually, I can not remember needing to bond baked to unbaked clay.  This tells you that I'm very remiss about using cool bails. 

About the chemicals, hubby and I are always working on something.  We have an array of 'chemicals'.  We have an order of using them.  First use nothing.  If that doesn't work, use alcohol.  If that doesn't work, use paint thinner (but, it stinks).  If that doesn't work, use laquer thinner.  Then, use acetone if none of the above works.  You'll notice that baby oil and booze are not on the list.  We may have to reconsider.  Problems, we have no babies, and we just like wine and coconut rum.  Does this stuff work?? ???

By the way, we have a long history with glues, too.  Our favorite is not c/a (cyanoacrylate, or super glue), but sometimes you need to use it.  You need to have a very tight contact surface for the thin c/a (super glue) to work.  This c/a goes everywhere.  If you have a good contact with your surface and fingers, it can really burn and really glue.  I like what we call medium c/a, the more gel like super glues.  They are 'gap filling' and do not go everywhere.  You can use an 'accelerator' to make them set quicker.  You want to use just what is needed to glue, or it will run everwhere or might bubble or turn white with the thicker glues.

If I may, a funny c/a story.  I was out shopping and hubby was home repairing a very big (70" wingspan) radio control airplane.  He called me and asked if I could come home.  He had glued the airplane to his hand!  This airplane is as big as he is!  He couldn't get out of his shop to get some acetone.  (Acetone will remove super glue.)  I was afraid he would chew off his hand before I made it home.  He didn't (chew off his hand), but removed a bit of skin from his fingers to get the plane off his hand.  Called me, but didn't wait for me to get home (which I didn't think he would, anyway).  Really, this makes me laugh everytime I think of it.

Happy gluing.  And, don't glue anything bigger than you are.

Hugs, Boni  8) in Sunny Yuma, Arizona

ShawnGCreations

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2012, 05:30:53 AM »
I use baby oil - mineral oil - sometimes, to soften too-hard clay - I guess that would be why you get such a nice smooth seam when you use it to join baked to unbaked - softening the edges of the unbaked part  :)  Good thinking!!

I find it easier to use than acetone or something like that. It's cheaper and you can control the effect more.

Wow, I did not know you could use baby oil to bond clay!  I'll have to try that.  Actually, I can not remember needing to bond baked to unbaked clay.  This tells you that I'm very remiss about using cool bails. 

About the chemicals, hubby and I are always working on something.  We have an array of 'chemicals'.  We have an order of using them.  First use nothing.  If that doesn't work, use alcohol.  If that doesn't work, use paint thinner (but, it stinks).  If that doesn't work, use laquer thinner.  Then, use acetone if none of the above works.  You'll notice that baby oil and booze are not on the list.  We may have to reconsider.  Problems, we have no babies, and we just like wine and coconut rum.  Does this stuff work?? ???

By the way, we have a long history with glues, too.  Our favorite is not c/a (cyanoacrylate, or super glue), but sometimes you need to use it.  You need to have a very tight contact surface for the thin c/a (super glue) to work.  This c/a goes everywhere.  If you have a good contact with your surface and fingers, it can really burn and really glue.  I like what we call medium c/a, the more gel like super glues.  They are 'gap filling' and do not go everywhere.  You can use an 'accelerator' to make them set quicker.  You want to use just what is needed to glue, or it will run everwhere or might bubble or turn white with the thicker glues.

If I may, a funny c/a story.  I was out shopping and hubby was home repairing a very big (70" wingspan) radio control airplane.  He called me and asked if I could come home.  He had glued the airplane to his hand!  This airplane is as big as he is!  He couldn't get out of his shop to get some acetone.  (Acetone will remove super glue.)  I was afraid he would chew off his hand before I made it home.  He didn't (chew off his hand), but removed a bit of skin from his fingers to get the plane off his hand.  Called me, but didn't wait for me to get home (which I didn't think he would, anyway).  Really, this makes me laugh everytime I think of it.

Happy gluing.  And, don't glue anything bigger than you are.

Hugs, Boni  8) in Sunny Yuma, Arizona

All it really does is soften the clay so it sitcks a little better. In the case of smoothing seems, with nothing it seems to just never smooth over baked clay. A little baby oil on your finger and problem solved.

I think i don't like using chemicals. I can be clumsy so perhaps I don't trust myself with chemicals  ;D I just buy a bottle of my local super market brand baby oil. Last for a while. I doubt wine would work. Not sure about coconut rum. Although I think just aboiut any kind of spirit would. Of course, the best way to find out is to experiment on a test piece. I do love experimenting. I find all kinds of new and useful things. I do, of course also destroy a few things but hey, that's part of it.

I generally hate super glue. Or it hates me (I once absent mindedly tried to chew off some partially dried super glue from my finger. Ended up with that hard film on my tongue and one tooth for a few days). I get better results from epoxies if I'm gluing.
Feel free to visit http://shawngcreations.co.za/ if you'd like to see what I do.

MelMcG

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2012, 09:04:10 AM »
LOL! I like super glue stories.  In my early polymer days before I discovered the gel superglue, I glued my thumb and forefinger of my left hand together just before I had to drive somewhere.  It made for an interesting journey trying to operate the stickshift as we drive on the left side of the road here.  My daughter was quite concerned at the noises that kept coming from the gearbox!

Mel  ;D

ejralph

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2012, 12:22:28 PM »
Lol at all the superglue stories.

In regards to baby / mineral oil ,it acts as a solvent on the clay and softens it. So it can help bonding I suppose in the same way that water does with ceramic clays.

Some years ago I did some mosaic projects by baking poly clay tiles and then mixing clay and oil into a soft paste as a bakeble grout. Worked well but I decided life was too short and there are better products out there for grouting.

Emma
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Sylvia

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2012, 02:34:19 PM »
What - like grout?  :)
Chalfont St Giles, Bucks, UK

MelMcG

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2012, 03:01:55 PM »
What - like grout?  :)

LOL!!!   ;D ;D ;D

Mel  ;D

Carrie

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2012, 04:23:55 PM »
Grout works really well...to grout polyclay tiles ;D :P :P

ejralph

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Re: Acetone - when to use?
« Reply #29 on: December 20, 2012, 09:21:04 PM »
Bingo!

Emma
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