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Author Topic: MIca Shift stamps  (Read 4728 times)

Jinx

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MIca Shift stamps
« on: December 06, 2011, 11:12:55 AM »
Hi All,

I've tried out the technic of Mica, but I'm not inteirely satisfeid..

I bought som pattern sheet in a shop for the Cake people, but I'm not sure they are deep enough as they a made for iceing and Marcipan coverring..

How deep is a stamp for mica to get the right dept for the patteren to realy come out.

Also I'll like to ask if you use mica powder in contrasting colors to get the metalic pearl look of a regular clay or do the mica powder "take over" the color of the clay..

I know you always says trial and error - It's just to get a hint, as I already wasted a part of my lovely new premo clay - in a mokume that didnīt turn out anything like expected.

Jinnie
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Shirley

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2011, 11:26:49 AM »
For mica shift I have always used the metallic clays rather than adding mica powder to clay. The stamps I've used are quite deep cut ones, I think they are probably 1 or 2 mm.

Good luck  :)
Shirley

Carrie

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2011, 08:08:53 PM »
Also, make sure to roll and re-roll the metallic clay through the machine in one direction only to align the particles of mica - so that they all lie the same way and catch the light well  :)

Jinx

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2011, 09:08:46 PM »
Thank you, I don't think my sheets are this deep.. have to find some others.

And I'll think I'll try to be aware of the rolling way in the pastamach.

Do make aeveral layers and stack - re stack or do you simply roll on widets setting or does it need to be a certain thickness.

Jinnie
To many things to try and too little time!
http://www.amio.dk/butik/madebyjia/produkter

Shirley

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2011, 09:31:45 PM »
I usually cut and stack, stamp, and then cut thin slices off.  :)
Shirley

Jinx

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2011, 09:39:58 PM »
Thanks I get so much weiser.. But how thick is you final sheet before you stamp..

Jinnie
To many things to try and too little time!
http://www.amio.dk/butik/madebyjia/produkter

Bev

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2011, 10:42:00 PM »
It doesn't need to be "thick thick". I'm sure when I've done it I just used the thickest setting on the machine. I use the commonly available texture sheets for polymer clay (or metal clay) use. After shaving off the layer & leveling the clay, if I need the finished article thicker I will use some backing clay.

Don't forget, if you don't like the result just re roll the clay - you're not going to waste it. I find 10 - 15 times through the machine enough to align the mica particles.

Jinx

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2011, 08:42:28 AM »
Didn't think a minut that the mica particals needed to be aligned, but it sound so obviously now that you have mentioned it..

Thanks

Jinnie
To many things to try and too little time!
http://www.amio.dk/butik/madebyjia/produkter

sunnisan

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2011, 01:20:25 PM »
There are quite a few free tutorials for a variety of mica shift techniques out on the internet in a number of different languages. The one I think you were talking about is called Holographic or Stamp Mica Shift. My favorite video is this one done is Spanish. The video is explicit enough to understand even without sound.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qNU8Vz829w&feature=related

This tutorial is how to make the Jellyroll Mica Shift
http://www.pcpolyzine.com/june2001/micaroll.html

This one is called Satin Swirl Mica Shift
http://polymerclaycentral.com/satinegg.html

Here is the Twisted Rope Mica Shift
http://www.polymerclaycentral.com/cyclopedia/micashift_projects.html

And this is the faux wood for making faux marquetry
http://www.pcpolyzine.com/june2001/wood.html

What mica shift is:
Translucent clay is saturated with powdered mica, much like the stuff you get for embellishing the surface of your designs. (You can make your own mica shift effect by adding a lot of your own mica powder to translucent clay but buying one of the pearls or metallics is far more cost effective.) Mica powders are made of teensy flakes of mica. Each flake has a broad flat side that reflects light and narrow edges that absorb the light. Kinda like how scraps of cardboard look. When you grab the clay and just mix it and moosh it just any old way the mica particles will be scattered throughout in higgledy-piggledy fashion. Think Pickup Stix here. They're all ajumble facing every which way. When you roll the clay in the same direction multiple times (20-30 times) as shown in the video linked above all of the flakes line up like little soldiers tooth by jowl. Just like smoothing all the Pickup Stix into a tidy pile where they are all aligned the same way. Now if you cut your sheet into 3 or more equal sizes and stack them, you'll see the top and bottoms of the stack are shiney while all the sides are dark. The shiney side is the faces or flat sides of all the mica facing the same direction reflecting the light back while the dark sides are the edges of the mica flakes that absorb the light. Now, take a needle tool and press it lengthwise into the shiney side of the clay. Then score a thin line with the tip. You have changed the landscape of the mica particles to conform to the new topography. The larger pressed trough has tipped some of the flakes so the edges are facing up. When you press the sides of the stack to "close" that indentation a scar will become noticeable in its place. The score from the tip of the needle has dragged through several layers of mica particles and torn them upward. You see an immediate change in "color." When you press something all the way through the stack from top to bottom, the particles will shift wherever that tool is placed. It's kinda fun to use the needle tool to write something or draw a picture into the surface then flatten it out a wee bit to make everything smooth again. Oh, if you make a mistake, drag a dry finger over the top a few times and that will align the top particles so they will reflect the light giving you a shiney spot. And, if you've inadvertantly smudged the dark surface creating that shiney spot, sand the tar out of that puppy to get that errant layer of reflecting particles outta the way.

hth ---sunni

Jinx

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2011, 04:15:37 PM »
Hi Sunni,

That was very helpfull, and I can't wait too try it out..

Jinnie
To many things to try and too little time!
http://www.amio.dk/butik/madebyjia/produkter

ejralph

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Re: MIca Shift stamps
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2011, 04:21:20 PM »
Hi Sunni

Great to have you here, long time no speak! Thanks for the useful info about Mica Shift - some great tips and links there.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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