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Author Topic: Hollow beads.  (Read 2931 times)

Beadbug

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Hollow beads.
« on: November 20, 2016, 11:06:51 PM »
Tonight I baked a experiment. I put a 2mm layer of clay over a halved ping pong ball to see if I could use ping pong balls as a substitute for a hollow ball maker and the answer is yes. I didn't use any release compound, I just loosened the edge and twisted it off. Sorry if you already knew this.

MilleD

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2016, 11:58:19 AM »
Interesting :)

Useful if you want to make a true round bead as the bead makers tend to make lentil shaped ones.  Which you can also do with this by not covering the full half.

ejralph

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2016, 12:22:07 PM »
There were some clayers around in the 90s/ early 2000s who I always think of for this idea as they used to make necklaces with big beads made over ping pong balls. They were known as City Zen Cane, but now I think they work under their own names of Ford and Forlano.
Many of the early claying books had examples of their work - they were very distinctive caners too

It is good to know halved balls also survive the baking process though - I would never have thought it and would have assumed they would just crinkle up in the heat. Just goes to show it is so important to experiment and learn stuff by trial and error sometimes than just assuming something will or won't work.

Thanks for sharing your findings with us
Keep us posted if you develop the idea further and make more things with your technique

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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Beadbug

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2016, 11:50:54 PM »
Hi, I'm not surprised it's been thought of before. I have seen some of Citizen Canes work but hadn't seen them using ping pong balls, well I don't suppose they give away all their secrets. I forgot to mention that I used Fimo Pro., higher temperatures might melt the ball- I think I have another experiment to do!

ejralph

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2016, 07:54:01 AM »
That is the thing with polymer clay  - nearly everything has been done before, but if we let that stop us, well none of us would make anything!

For the first 2 or 3 years that I was claying in earnest, I genuinely thought I had invented millefiori caning! I was quite pouty when I saw someone at a craft fair who had made beads using the same ideas. Then I find out people were even doing it in the 60s before I was born.

I mean, that is pretty low isnt it. To copy someone before they have even been born. Some people have no shame!

But I think it is really common in crafts - that whole serendipity thing. Good ideas bubble up in multiple places around the same sort of time. And we all use the medium in broadly similar ways so we think along broadly similar lines when it comes to "I wonder if that will work..." or "hey, I wonder if this craft technique from glass/ceramic/sugarpaste etc will work in clay?" and so consequently lots of us end up doing often quite similar things

When the mica based metallic clays first came out - there were two pretty well know clay artists at the time who both independantly stumbled across the mica shift properties of the clay and each of them developed their own ways for manipulating that. Now the concept of mica shift is pretty universal but at the time it was very new and exciting for us clayers!

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

Beadbug

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2016, 07:46:11 PM »
So I made a 'basket ' out of Cernit and Sculpey, blue and gold respectively, draped this lattice over the ping pong ball and baked it at 130* for 15mins. The clay was only about 1mm thick so 15mins., was probably too long, but this was a test for the ball and it survived unscathed. As I was doing this I thought it would be possible to make some really delicate filigree work over a thin skin of translucent, might make some nice xmas tree decorations.

ejralph

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2016, 08:03:41 PM »
That sounds really awesome! I hope you'll post some photos of your experiments?

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

Beadbug

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2016, 12:20:17 AM »
I will when I've got a few more photos done. It's a pain in the neck the way I have to do it that's why I don't post much in the way of photos. If there was a simple way of reducing photo size from the iPad I'd do more but the method I found on the net didn't work so I'm stuck with downloading from the camera, to the laptop then sending the reduced image to my iPad for posting on the forum whew!

MilleD

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2016, 08:00:03 AM »
Can you not use a photo sharing site such as Flickr and link to that rather than uploading the photo here?

You see, and I don't know if I'm making myself clear here, WE NEED PHOTOS.

 ;D

Beadbug

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2016, 10:43:42 PM »
Sorry, I'm not very good with technology and tend to stick to what I know.

Beadbug

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Re: Hollow beads.
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2016, 10:15:50 PM »
Re. Baking over a ping pong ball. I've been informed that what I have baked over is not a 'real' ping pong ball at all but simply a plastic ball. I didn't have clue, sorry. So it looks like I'm going to have to get some 'real' ping pong balls and try this experiment again.