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Author Topic: different clays  (Read 2148 times)

Julie132

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different clays
« on: May 25, 2016, 03:44:12 PM »
Can someone explain to me what the difference is in all the clays.  Polymer, Cermic etc.  Ive only just started using them and wondered what the difference was.

Carrie

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Re: different clays
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2016, 05:08:22 PM »
Hi Julie.  They are all polymer clays, and the different names are the brand names. 

They all behave a little differently from each other and l'm no expert but hopefully someone will be able to tell you more about their different properties - different polymer clays work better for some things than others.

Julie132

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Re: different clays
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2016, 10:56:01 PM »
Thanks Carrie x

Carrie

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Re: different clays
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2016, 08:48:47 AM »
Hi again  :)

There is a lot of very good - and accurate - information on Ginger Davis Allman's blog, The Blue Bottle Tree.   She has covered just about every question you are likely to have!  Here's the link to her info about the different brands of polymer clay:

https://thebluebottletree.com/best-polymer-clay-brand/

ejralph

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Re: different clays
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2016, 05:44:15 PM »
That is an excellent link and should tell you everything about the different brands.

What I would say though , they are all broadly similar.  So when you are starting out, yes - try out as many as you can, but it is not worth getting in a tizz if a certain brand isn't available to you. It probably won't be all THAT different to what you can find easily.

Just remember the clays fall broadly into two categories - those that are fairly brittle after baking and better for kids use or for making quite solid items that are not at risk of breaking anyway. And those more "professional" clays that are stronger after baking.

The more professional clays will generally be a bit more firm out of the packet and take a bit more kneading to make them ready for use, but that is the pay off for having the baked clay be a bit more robust.

I always feel that the American brands of clay look a bit more "plasticky" when baked and the European brands seem a bit more chalky. This is very subjective however - I suspect there is more kaolin added to the European brands, but I don't know for sure as no clay company ever reveals their ingredients.

But that in itself is a good illustration of how we all get a FEEL for the different brands we try out - and my experiences and my feel for things won't be the same as Carries, or yours or anyone else really. Clay choice really is a very personal thing.

When you are starting out - it is easy to get bamboozled with all the different products out there -especially when you read people raving about one clay or another.

But most techniques you will want to try can be done with any and all of the brands.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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