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Author Topic: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?  (Read 11670 times)

Carrie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2014, 11:44:36 PM »
I haven't used a heat resistant mat - is it like that teflon baking sheet?  If so the reason l don't use it is because it's too flexible for my purpose.

What l do is make something on my glass work surface, and turn it over (using the blade to remove it) as necessary until it's finished on both sides.  Sometimes l move it to a ceramic tile out of the way while l work on something else;  what l never ever do is bake directly on a tile - except when l make polyclay texture sheets or moulds when l want them well stuck down.

Things don't curl up - l see no need to have things stuck down to bake them. 

FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2014, 09:22:16 PM »
I haven't used a heat resistant mat - is it like that teflon baking sheet?  If so the reason l don't use it is because it's too flexible for my purpose.

I dunno, mine just looks like a sheet of brown cotton that's been coated in plastic.
I cooked my previous lot of sculpey on it, but as you say - it's so flexible it was hard to get it and the clay pieces into the oven. I had to fold it as I didn't want to cut it and that made the clay pieces unsteady.
That's why I baked on tiles this time around - I prefer that I think, less cumbersome.

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What l do is make something on my glass work surface, and turn it over (using the blade to remove it) as necessary until it's finished on both sides.  Sometimes l move it to a ceramic tile out of the way while l work on something else;  what l never ever do is bake directly on a tile - except when l make polyclay texture sheets or moulds when l want them well stuck down.

Things don't curl up - l see no need to have things stuck down to bake them.

Why don't you bake directly on a tile, Carrie?

What do you mean 'polyclay texture sheets or moulds'?
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Carrie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2014, 09:52:27 PM »
I don't bake directly on a tile because l don't like the spotty shiny back on my pieces which would need to be sanded off - creating work!

When l use a tile in the oven l put a piece of paper between my work and the tile. 

I almost always make a textured back on pieces so only the front might need more work, depending on the project, but the back is finished.

I enjoy making moulds from buttons and charms and so on, that l can use to make beads etc. I press an object into a smooth lump of clay and bake it.  You need to use a "mould release" to use these or the raw clay will stick in the mould - cornflour or a light misting of water work well.  Look at the photo at top left of the page, showing Emma's yellow and brown beads - they might be made with a mould.

Texture sheets made of clay - just roll a small sheet of clay, make an interesting texture on it - with tools, plant material, found objects, etc etc and when baked use it to add texture to your projects.  Use a mould release as before.
I bake these and the moulds stuck down on a ceramic tile because l am not concerned about what the back looks like.



FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2014, 06:05:18 PM »
I don't bake directly on a tile because l don't like the spotty shiny back on my pieces which would need to be sanded off - creating work!

Okay, I see.

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When l use a tile in the oven l put a piece of paper between my work and the tile. 

I almost always make a textured back on pieces so only the front might need more work, depending on the project, but the back is finished.

How do you texture the back and yet work on the front without squashing the texture you just put on the back?

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I enjoy making moulds from buttons and charms and so on, that l can use to make beads etc. I press an object into a smooth lump of clay and bake it.  You need to use a "mould release" to use these or the raw clay will stick in the mould - cornflour or a light misting of water work well.  Look at the photo at top left of the page, showing Emma's yellow and brown beads - they might be made with a mould.

I have used various mold making compounds, including Sculpey's Moldmaker (which doesn't work very well, but I'm going to try again at 5 degrees higher – as Polyform suggested when I mentioned the problem to them.) Easy Mold and a blue one I got from a firm – now defunct I think, but the silicone mold stuff went off and thus became unusable. 2 other makes, both of which were blue - one came expensively in small pots - one in larger pots and neither of which can I recall the name of.
But now I finally have some 'Amazing Mold Maker' my husband just came back from the USA and brought me some – I'm thrilled, cos it's not available in the country normally!

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Texture sheets made of clay - just roll a small sheet of clay, make an interesting texture on it - with tools, plant material, found objects, etc etc and when baked use it to add texture to your projects.  Use a mould release as before.
I bake these and the moulds stuck down on a ceramic tile because l am not concerned about what the back looks like.

Interesting, I've often used found objects – and once tried taking a mould (in plaster) from some interesting looking tree bark – didn’t work though. Made molds from found objects, but didn't think of making 'texture sheets' as you describe, I like that idea very much, I'd like to have a go at that sometime.
Mind you it's only recently I've had much clay to use.

Do you have any images of these texture sheets one can look at anywhere?
« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 06:07:29 PM by FranOnTheEdge »
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Carrie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2014, 07:13:19 PM »
I've made most of my moulds and all my texture plates from polyclay.  I recently got some two-part stuff for a particular project but not for "ordinary" moulds.  I have used Sculpey Mouldmaker but l didn't find any advantages over using ordinary polyclay - however, that's just my findings from my use of it.  Scrap clay (of which l have loads) is perfect for trying out texture sheets and mould making - just blend it to a uniform colour before use.  ( I love scrap and couldn't do without it but it does build up!!)

As for texturing the back and neither squashing it or the carefully made front...well, l'm afraid that is just practise: developing methods that suit what you're making and trial and error.  It avoids having to do anything to the back and hides fingerprints etc etc.   Making the front and a thin backing separately perhaps - or whatever works for you.  A texture like coarse material or sandpaper or the sort of sponge sheet that's sold for filters in fish tanks- all are useful.  Something that's flexible is  helpful.  But of course a smooth back, while possibly more work is lovely too  :)

In this photo you can see a couple of home-made polyclay texture sheets - the possibilities are limitless - l get carried away making them!  https://www.flickr.com/photos/29443904@N06/5929984313/


monkey ann

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2014, 07:37:11 PM »
Hi Fran

I managed to find Amazing mold for sale in this country, I also bought some Oyumaru.  Strange stuff, to use it, you put in hot water, it goes soft, you shape it, leave it go cold to harden.  Then if you don't like what you have made, just and re-heat to re-use it again.
Ann from Croydon, Surrey

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2014, 11:31:33 AM »
I've made most of my moulds and all my texture plates from polyclay.  I recently got some two-part stuff for a particular project but not for "ordinary" moulds.
 

Okay, I now have loads of questions. Lol!
How big are your 'texture plates'?
What have you used to make them? (not the clay, the impressions, if you don't mind saying that is.)
And what to you is an 'ordinary mould'? ditto a not ordinary one – and why?

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I have used Sculpey Moldmaker but l didn't find any advantages over using ordinary polyclay - however, that's just my findings from my use of it.

Well I can think of one right now: I don’t have to use any of my other clay and I can't use MoldMaker for anything else.
But I was also wondering about how you are finding working with it on these hot days, since for me it's practically a mush and thus very hard to use without most of it coming off on my fingers.
I've tried using a fridge, but I think I'd need a walk-in fridge, it just returns to mush so fast once out of the fridge.

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Scrap clay (of which l have loads) is perfect for trying out texture sheets and mould making - just blend it to a uniform colour before use.  ( I love scrap and couldn't do without it but it does build up!!)

I have no scrap clay whatsoever.... yet. (I've only made stuff with a single colour so far (beige).

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As for texturing the back and neither squashing it or the carefully made front...well, I'm afraid that is just practise: developing methods that suit what you're making and trial and error.  It avoids having to do anything to the back and hides fingerprints etc etc.

Oh I saw this in a recent YouTube vid – someone pressed their pendant onto a texture sheet, and then just left it in place while working on the front, so simple!  I can't believe I never thought of it – mind you that won't work if you make an individual hand tooled texture for the back... but still, it's one way.

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Making the front and a thin backing separately perhaps - or whatever works for you.  A texture like coarse material or sandpaper or the sort of sponge sheet that's sold for filters in fish tanks- all are useful.  Something that's flexible is helpful.  But of course a smooth back, while possibly more work is lovely too  :)

Or making a mould of the hand made texture, then you can press the pendant (or broach or earring etc) into that sheet mould and work on that to your heart's content.

Quote
In this photo you can see a couple of home-made polyclay texture sheets - the possibilities are limitless - l get carried away making them!  https://www.flickr.com/photos/29443904@N06/5929984313/

Gosh, they looked so good that for a moment or two I wasn't sure where the texture sheet was, it all looked like jewelry!

Thanks for posting that link.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2014, 02:25:11 PM by FranOnTheEdge »
FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2014, 11:35:43 AM »
Hi Fran

I managed to find Amazing mold for sale in this country, I also bought some Oyumaru.  Strange stuff, to use it, you put in hot water, it goes soft, you shape it, leave it go cold to harden.  Then if you don't like what you have made, just and re-heat to re-use it again.

Oh yes, that Oyumaru stuff would work great to make a temporary mould of your hand-made texture for the back of something like a pendant, then you could press your pendant into the mould and it would be protected while you work on the front - and once done if you only wanted a single version of that tooling on the back - just re-melt the Oyumaru.
I'll have to have another look at that - when I've got some more money.
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Carrie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #23 on: July 24, 2014, 03:05:06 PM »
I think you've answered most of your questions!
But in your answer to Ann you talk about making a mould from your home-made texture with Oyumaru - why not use the home-made texture directly?

I recently followed a tutorial where l needed to make flexible moulds so l used two-part moulding putty - those were the special moulds l referred too.  Otherwise l make rigid moulds.

That Mouldmaker stuff is weird....the only thing l've used it for recently is as a clay softener and oh boy oh boy - it only needs a tiny tiny piece to turn ordinary clay into mush if l'm not careful!   I made some moulds from it when l first got it: I seem to remember it suggests keeping it in the fridge......




Bonipie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2014, 03:23:14 PM »
I use clay for my molds.  You make them very nice because you want the transferred image to be very nice.  Mine are much like Carrie's.  I make a negative and positive for each mold.  You never know what kind of image you might want in the future.  I would never destroy a mold.  You never know when you might want it again.  (Like a customer would like 'another'.)  A clay mold is very nice because it is very sturdy, gives a very crisp transfer.  I have a couple molds (from mold making stuff) friends have graciously given me and I find them not the sturdiness I am used to.

In making a pendant back, you can apply the back while working on the front, leaving the pendant on the mold.  If this isn't practical, you can make your front, bake it (maybe even for a shorter amount of time-enough to set the clay, but not enough for it to survive eternity), then apply the back and rebake.

Scrap-you will have it, and if you give it a chance, you will love it.  I would give away unused clay, but I wouldn't give away my scrap.  The following photos are the story of my favorite scrap.  First photos is a 'chrysanthemum' cane.  It can be beautiful, but this one was just plane ugly.  And, chrysanthemum canes can be 'BIG'-this one was.  I just put it in my scrap box.  Jan, on this forum, challenged me to make something great with it.  So, I took the easy route, and made an extruded bracelet.  The rest of the cane just sat and got old.  This spring, I needed a lot of scrap for a project-lots of experimenting.  So, I started reconditioning the ugly cane.  I was into my conditioning, and the layers of the cane were just separating and falling apart and making a big mess of my pasta machine.  I then realized that this could be beautiful.  I cut away the broken up edges and made the rolled up clay pendant from the edges.  (I love broken edges!).  I put away my wonderful ugly cane-happy that I made such a huge amount of my favorite cane!

You will always, eventually have a use for your clay.  You must have some on hand (I have about 50 pounds on hand), or it won't be there when you need it.  You can make molds of clay, but you can't use the mold material in place of clay.  By the way, when you make a mold of clay, make it sturdy.  You need plenty of pressure to impress clay, and you don't want your mold to break.  I use 2 layers of clay at the biggest setting on my pasta machine, so nearly 1/4" thick.  When you make a mold, then make a copy of the mold and this gives you a negative of the mold.  You can use anything to make the design.  My favorites are sandpaper, extruded clay or rolled by hand, and ball shaped tools.  When you use or make a mold, remember to use mold release (water, etc.) before impressing clay on the mold or the clay will stick to the mold, possibly ruining it or at least making a lot of work for you.

Hugs, Boni  8) in Wonderful Yuma, Arizona

FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2014, 02:04:08 PM »
I think you've answered most of your questions!
But in your answer to Ann you talk about making a mould from your home-made texture with Oyumaru - why not use the home-made texture directly?

I was thinking of the kind of texture where you create a hand tooled design on the back, if you do that and then turn the pendant over – in order to work on the front – then every push, press and prod at the front is going to flatten out the texture on the back, unless that back has been baked separately, or unless you are pressing and pushing the front of the pendant with a mould behind it,

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recently followed a tutorial where l needed to make flexible moulds so l used two-part moulding putty - those were the special moulds l referred too.  Otherwise l make rigid moulds.

Oh right.  Whereas I never thought of making rigid moulds, and simply began with a silicone mold compound – so for me that's the normal, rigid would be unusual.
Interesting how people come to the same discipline from different directions resulting in slightly different practices.

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That Mouldmaker stuff is weird....the only thing l've used it for recently is as a clay softener and oh boy oh boy - it only needs a tiny tiny piece to turn ordinary clay into mush if l'm not careful!   I made some moulds from it when l first got it: I seem to remember it suggests keeping it in the fridge......

I am now doing just that. I left it in overnight, and that has made it possible for me to remove the moldmaker from the doll's hand without distortions.

But boy am I glad I have it.  It makes such a difference to conditioning really old clay.
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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2014, 05:14:54 PM »
I use clay for my molds.  You make them very nice because you want the transferred image to be very nice.  Mine are much like Carrie's.  I make a negative and positive for each mold.  You never know what kind of image you might want in the future.  I would never destroy a mold.  You never know when you might want it again.  (Like a customer would like 'another'.)

Exactly!  Or you dropped and broke your favourite pendant. I haven't made any negatives though – that's a thought.

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A clay mold is very nice because it is very sturdy, gives a very crisp transfer.  I have a couple molds (from mold making stuff) friends have graciously given me and I find them not the sturdiness I am used to.

Oh I like the ease of removing clay from silicone moulds. I've got a stiff mould for making a rose... a bought one.  And it's just impossible to remove the clay from the mould without ruining it – so it's just completely unusable.

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In making a pendant back, you can apply the back while working on the front, leaving the pendant on the mold.  If this isn't practical, you can make your front, bake it (maybe even for a shorter amount of time-enough to set the clay, but not enough for it to survive eternity), then apply the back and rebake.

Yes, that's what I saw in a YouTube vid. Someone modelling the front of the pendant while it sat on the mould for the back.

Quote
Scrap-you will have it, and if you give it a chance, you will love it.  I would give away unused clay, but I wouldn't give away my scrap.  The following photos are the story of my favorite scrap.  First photos is a 'chrysanthemum' cane.  It can be beautiful, but this one was just plane ugly.  And, chrysanthemum canes can be 'BIG'-this one was.  I just put it in my scrap box.  Jan, on this forum, challenged me to make something great with it.  So, I took the easy route, and made an extruded bracelet.  The rest of the cane just sat and got old.  This spring, I needed a lot of scrap for a project-lots of experimenting.  So, I started reconditioning the ugly cane.  I was into my conditioning, and the layers of the cane were just separating and falling apart and making a big mess of my pasta machine.  I then realized that this could be beautiful.  I cut away the broken up edges and made the rolled up clay pendant from the edges.  (I love broken edges!).  I put away my wonderful ugly cane-happy that I made such a huge amount of my favorite cane!

I didn't realise you could make something out of broken edges, but the very notion appeals to me greatly, since most YouTube vids show people cutting off the ends over and over again when they are making canes – the waste makes me cringe, and I think it's that which has put me off making canes myself.
Even though there are techniques I'd love to try – which involve canes at some stage or another. Like that lentil swirl bead with silver foil by ArchiDee.

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You will always, eventually have a use for your clay.  You must have some on hand (I have about 50 pounds on hand),

50 pounds of scrap???  !!!!  I haven't even got 50 pounds of clay altogether!  Man oh man!

[/quote]or it won't be there when you need it.  You can make molds of clay, but you can't use the mold material in place of clay.  By the way, when you make a mold of clay, make it sturdy.  You need plenty of pressure to impress clay, and you don't want your mold to break.  I use 2 layers of clay at the biggest setting on my pasta machine, so nearly 1/4" thick. [/quote]

So this isn't thick enough then?


[/quote]When you make a mold, then make a copy of the mold and this gives you a negative of the mold.  You can use anything to make the design.  My favorites are sandpaper, extruded clay or rolled by hand, and ball shaped tools.  When you use or make a mold, remember to use mold release (water, etc.) before impressing clay on the mold or the clay will stick to the mold, possibly ruining it or at least making a lot of work for you.

Hugs, Boni  8) in Wonderful Yuma, Arizona
[/quote]

Yes, I already found that out... duh!
FranOnTheEdge

Carrie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2014, 06:14:12 PM »
For texture plates - like the one in the photo above, which is probably thick enough if well-cured, and of strong clay - l wouldn't like them made of moulding putty - far too soft, imo, anyway.  I love bought rubber ones but they are much firmer.  I would only make mine with polyclay.
Also polyclay for simple moulds, eg of buttons. 
Easy to remove if you've used cornflour or water.  If something's a bit reluctant to come out you can usually "grab" it with a small piece of soft polyclay - l used that method with ceramic clay too.

Bonipie

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2014, 06:52:57 PM »
 ;D  I don't have 50 lbs of scrap, I have 50 lbs of clay.  I don't usually have a lot of scrap as I use it up as I am working.

Hugs, Boni  8) in Wonderful Yuma, Arizona

FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Can I Bake on a Ceramic tile?
« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2014, 12:40:46 AM »
For texture plates - like the one in the photo above, which is probably thick enough if well-cured, and of strong clay - l wouldn't like them made of moulding putty - far too soft, imo, anyway.  I love bought rubber ones but they are much firmer.  I would only make mine with polyclay.
Also polyclay for simple moulds, eg of buttons. 
Easy to remove if you've used cornflour or water.  If something's a bit reluctant to come out you can usually "grab" it with a small piece of soft polyclay - l used that method with ceramic clay too.

I might get some Bake N' Bend - I've heard that makes great flexible molds, good for textures.

Yes, I've heard the cornflour or water thing a lot, I'll try it next time.
I've got lots of button moulds - silicone ones though.

I've made the sheet a bit thicker and a bit bigger:
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 12:43:49 AM by FranOnTheEdge »
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