EJR Beads

Author Topic: What is your favourite technique?  (Read 10227 times)

shelleym

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • ShelleyM
    • ShelleyM
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2011, 09:14:48 AM »
Recently I've had fun playing with both of the awesome extruded flower cane techniques - the one with the tube bead adaptor and the one with two dies and the rubber ring. Anyone else tried these? They are really cool!

I've never heard of this technique! Can you tell me where to find it?
Shelley

Pat Longmuir

  • Guest
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2011, 09:28:04 AM »
Like Di, I tend to swing from one technique to another (probably I have a short attention span)! What I would suggest to Anna though is that those chunks of cane that you think you will never use can come in really handy for doing sheets of "fabric" effect clay for making jewellery or covering boxes etc.   I tried Yonat Dascalu's tutorial for this but a lot of other people have their own methods for using up cane ends like that.

Silverleaf Shiny Stuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • Anna Roberts
    • Silverleaf Shiny Stuff
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2011, 05:15:35 PM »
In respect to using two dies and the rubber gasket, I don't recommend people using their extruders in the way this technique suggests.

It puts enormous strain on the screw-threads where all the parts join together. (The parts no longer screw together fully, so all the pressure is going on half the amount of thread and it just shears off after a while). I have had several people trying to return extruders that they have broken by trying out this technique.

The rubber gasket in with extruders is just a spare cleaning gasket and not really meant to be used as a spacer.

So, as a seller of extruders I feel obliged to point this out  - (and for anyone who bought their extruder from me, try it if you will - but don't come running to me if you break your extruder  ;D )

I think it is great that clayers constantly try new things and adapt tools and stuff. Just sometimes some stuff I see people advising goes a bit beyond what the tools were originally designed to withstand.

Emma



I hadn't thought about that, but I make sure the clay I use is really soft and well conditioned and I only fill the extruder 1/3 to 1/2 full, and if my extruder dies a bit sooner than it would have done otherwise, I don't really mind.  I promise I won't try to return it! ;) It's coped for over a year so it's all good.

Shelly, the one with the core adaptor is here http://babelfish.yahoo.com/translate_url?doit=done&tt=url&intl=1&fr=bf-home&trurl=http%3A%2F%2Fparoledepate.canalblog.com%2Farchives%2F2009%2F09%2F28%2F15190504.html&lp=fr_en&btnTrUrl=Translate. The page is translated from French so it's a bit like gibberish but the pics are clear enough.

The rubber ring one's in Russian and I can't get it to translate and the pics aren't very clear. http://grgalina.livejournal.com/58240.html It's similar to the other one except you use a large die (hexagonal or square seem popular) and the 7-hole die with the spare rubber gasket ring as a spacer between them. The 7-hole one goes closest to the clay. You put your finger over the end of the extruder and extrude slowly until you feel the clay press up against it and clump together, then extrude slowly and smoothly. The 7 strands will hopefully clump together in one thick strand, which has a flower pattern when you cut into it.

I guess use that one at your own (or your extruder's) risk. The one with the core adapter shouldn't cause a problem though as it's used exactly the way it was designed to.

shelleym

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • ShelleyM
    • ShelleyM
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2011, 05:29:59 PM »
Thanks Anna. I had already tried and experimented with the first one you mentioned - didn't know anyone else had tried that! I wouldn't have thought of the second one with the gasket between, probably cos you aint meant to do that and I'd be afraid of breaking it (like Emma says).

Thanks for the info - I'd never seen those tutes, and they were reasonably easy to understand anyway.
Shelley

ejralph

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6030
  • They're not people, they're Hippies
    • EJR Beads
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2011, 05:39:49 PM »
You should see the state some people have tried to return broken extruders in! They tell me "oh I have hardly used it" - although they have used it enough to scuff every surface, inside and out, and worn it so much the printing has long since vanished  ::)

I know darn well when they have been doing this double-die thing, because the damage is always in the same places. Been selling the things for a good few years now and never a problem until this blinking technique reared its ugly head  ;D

That said, Anna - I agree with you, if its a technique you want to do and are prepared to not get such a long life from the tool then its worth it. Afterall, these extruders are very good value for what they enable us to do.

I think not filling the barrel beyond 1/3 is a really good idea though. I do the same with mine and it has lasted forever. I am sure half the problem with this technique is that people are using very hard or unconditioned clay and then filling the barrels right up.

Emma

Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
www.ejrbeads.co.uk Projects, articles, bead galleries & more
www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

Silverleaf Shiny Stuff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • Anna Roberts
    • Silverleaf Shiny Stuff
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2011, 05:57:59 PM »
No problem, Shelley. :) I love to share! And I've spent so many hours of my life being ill and surfing the web for clay techniques that there's a lot of stuff in the back of my head, most of which I'm yet to try out. ;)

Emma, really? The cheek of some people! I've used mine a LOT and I can still see the writing. No scratches or damage that I can see, and the threads still look perfect. Guess I'm careful. I reckon it would be easy to knacker up the threads by not aligning them correctly and using too much force, or like you said, using too much clay and/or clay that's too hard. I don't doubt that the double-die thing doesn't help much either. But meh, if mine breaks, I'll buy another from you. ;)

ejralph

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6030
  • They're not people, they're Hippies
    • EJR Beads
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2011, 06:12:43 PM »
I think the problem is just that less threads are taking all the strain, so the pressure on those is that much greater.

But like you say, there are ways to do things that minimise problems and there are ways that will maximise them. The one that scares me more is people hooking these things up to electric drills  ::) Just how they think a hand tool like an extruder will be able to cope with that is beyond me!

I can even see that the motor I added to the pasta machine is pushing it - and I know it will murder the PM in the end, and that is a motor sold by the PM maker especially for it. But of course, the squishing of genuine pasta is a lot less work for these machines that what we expect of them.

Much the same with these extruders - you pays your money and takes your choice in these matters I guess.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
www.ejrbeads.co.uk Projects, articles, bead galleries & more
www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

shelleym

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • ShelleyM
    • ShelleyM
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2011, 07:20:45 PM »
Emma - I've had a pasta motor for years (got one after I got tennis elbow from turning the handle!) anyway, it's been making slightly off-putting grinding noises for a few years now, but it still works! But I know it's days are numbered, although I am surprised at the punishment it has taken and it still goes.

I just wish I could remember where the heck I got it from. I know I got it the same place as the PM - but can't remember where. Had the place book-marked, but lost it all when my computer went bluey last year. Where did you get yours from, or are you thinking of selling them?
Shelley

noani

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 517
  • Eva
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2011, 07:40:18 PM »
I have the Makings extruder, and i'm pleased....wont try to return it if broken ;) Mostly use it for the flowercane you linked to Silverleaf doing my little horsies as shown in the picture...
But i've been claying since august 2010 and am on my third pastamachine....The Firemountain one the gear wheel broke , the Sculpey needed cleaning and i took it apart and it never got the same again...now i have a Atlas and hope it will last a long time....

ejralph

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6030
  • They're not people, they're Hippies
    • EJR Beads
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2011, 08:30:59 PM »
Emma - I've had a pasta motor for years (got one after I got tennis elbow from turning the handle!) anyway, it's been making slightly off-putting grinding noises for a few years now, but it still works! But I know it's days are numbered, although I am surprised at the punishment it has taken and it still goes.

I just wish I could remember where the heck I got it from. I know I got it the same place as the PM - but can't remember where. Had the place book-marked, but lost it all when my computer went bluey last year. Where did you get yours from, or are you thinking of selling them?
Shelley

I have had terrible tennis elbow problems for the last year or so. Its why I got the motor myself!

Glad to hear they just sound worse than they are though. I can't remember where I bought mine either. Some kitchenware shop or other, just googled around for it.

I don't sell pasta machines because they are so heavy to send and so easy to find on the high-street these days.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
www.ejrbeads.co.uk Projects, articles, bead galleries & more
www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

shelleym

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • ShelleyM
    • ShelleyM
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2011, 10:16:39 PM »
So I'm not the only one who got tennis elbow from cranking a handle!!! I'm in good company. It has helped if that's any use to you!

I can understand about not selling the PM - they are blinking heavy to post. But decent ones are difficult to find.

Shelley


ejralph

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6030
  • They're not people, they're Hippies
    • EJR Beads
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2011, 10:26:52 PM »
I must be a pasta machine philistine you know, because I have had all sorts and never found any of them to be better than the others.

I just go for the cheapest I can, run it into the ground and then on to the next victim...

The tennis elbow  started from doing a Michael Mackintyre and thinking I could carry all the shopping in one go. I was half way up the stairs and felt both elbows go. But I couldn't put the bags down until I was at the top. Since then, it has been really bad and its the lampworking and typing that really aggravate it worst. But I have had to go ergonomic on pretty much everything I do now or I am pretty bad in both arms.

The worse part is at night as I just cannot rest my arms on the best beside me and have to find odd ways to balance them on myself. Well annoying.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
www.ejrbeads.co.uk Projects, articles, bead galleries & more
www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies

shelleym

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 745
  • ShelleyM
    • ShelleyM
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2011, 10:33:56 PM »
Take care of your arms/body. It's horrid when thing like that happen. Year before last when my Mum was ill I spent most of the summer (when not lugging things to shows) lugging my suitcase to London and then all over the London underground, the stairs and all over the place. Needless to say I ended up with a really bad shoulder. After masses of physio. injections and rest and 18 months later, it's only now beginning to feel better - but then my busy season hasn't started yet, so I don't know how it will be once I'm back into the 'swing of it'. I'm hoping the rest will have got me back on track again.

Shelley

KMD

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2011, 10:57:28 PM »
Oh no, I got Tennis Elbow last year thats why ive been a bit relaxed with the claying I thought it was from work, I was also doing a lot of chainmail!!!

Had to have injections and loads of time off very painful and still a problem... where can I get a pasta machine with a motor????
 :(
Karen

ejralph

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6030
  • They're not people, they're Hippies
    • EJR Beads
Re: What is your favourite technique?
« Reply #29 on: April 14, 2011, 11:17:43 PM »
The motors are separate to the pasta machine - I think my brand is Imperia. Just google Pasta machine with motor and you should get lots of returns

I already had the pasta machine so I only had to get the motor to go with it. But they do bundles as well where you can buy both at the same time.

The downside is that its a lot harder to clean the gunky clay out. Maybe one of these days I will get around to pimping the machine and removing the scraper blades and whatnot, which should help.

Usually, I just roll a sheet of scrap clay back and forth through the pasta machine and the action of going one way and then re-rolling back in the other direction dislodges the gunky clay onto the scrap clay sheet. But with the motors, they don't have a reverse!

Maybe I can ask Mr Man to modify it?

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
www.ejrbeads.co.uk Projects, articles, bead galleries & more
www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop Art beads, clay & jewellery supplies