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Author Topic: Clay Mixing  (Read 5600 times)

hokuspokus74

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Clay Mixing
« on: June 27, 2013, 03:03:40 PM »
Hi

Am wondering if you can use polymer clay canes etc on air drying clay?
Or how can i save on having to use my fimo to make the beads before adding my canes slices etc etc?

all ideas welcome :)

regards
Graham
Thanks for all your help.

ejralph

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2013, 03:46:05 PM »
You can use up old scrap polymer clay in the middle of beads. Or you can work over an armature of something else - for example scrunched up aluminium foil or pressed cotton paper beads ( http://www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17_180&products_id=4792 )

I don't know if you can use air-dry clay alongside polymer clay. Maybe someone else here who has tried it could let you know one way or the other?

My concerns would be that maybe the air dry clay wouldn't like being heated, or more likely it might expand/contract at a different rate to the polymer clay and end up with cracking issues?

But so very often in these things - the best thing is to just do some experiments and see if it works.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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hokuspokus74

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2013, 04:07:15 PM »
Thanks Emma for your info,i think its going to have to be the experimental side of it.
What is pressed cotton paper beads.
Thanks for all your help.

ejralph

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2013, 05:54:15 PM »
They are really just as they sound - compressed cotton paper formed into ball shapes.

They don't have a hole, but you can easily make one with a needle. Cover them with clay and bake. Or, if you make quite a large threading hole in the clay layer, you can soak the bead in water after and winkle out the soggy cotton paper to leave a hollow bead.

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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kscottcrafts

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2013, 11:55:39 PM »
I don't know about airdry clay, but you can however use sculpey ultralight clay as an armature- I've not tried it myself but the manufacturers actually suggest it themselves in a booklet.

Elizabeth Campbell

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2013, 08:33:19 PM »
Hi,

I have tried one air-drying clay ('Newclay') but didn't find it useful.  I found it too heavy, and also I really struggled to get the polyclay to stick to it; had to use several applications of TLS (translucent liquid sculpey) as a base but even then the polyclay top layer wasn't really secure...  But that is only my own experience, the experience of others may differ.  And indeed, there may be other air-drying clays out there that work better...

The two clays I use mostly as base layers are Sculpey Ultralight and Super Sculpey 'firm'. 

The Sculpey Ultralight is brilliant for jewellery where you want to keep the item as light as possible.  I use a lot of this stuff....   The instructions with it say to condition the clay before use, but my experience has taught me that this makes the clay harder to use.  Far better to just take a piece of clay straight from the package, push it into a rough ball with your fingers, and then shape it straight away with as little handling as possible.  It feels like marshmallow, so isn't as easy to work as conventional polyclay; but after baking it can be carved and sanded really easily.  I love this stuff!!!

I use Super Sculpey firm when I want a base that has strength.  It seems very dense and is quite a heavy clay and so I find it useful for items other than jewellery where that weight and strength are important.  I'm currently using it to make polyclay boxes.

There are also many other things that can be covered with polyclay.  Almost anything that can fit in your oven and withstand 130 degrees can be covered with polyclay; ie, wood, glass, metal, papier mache and ceramic.  The possibilities are endless!

Edited to add: you can also use cornstarch packaging pellets to make hollow beads.  Just press one or two into a rough ball (you may just want to wet your fingers first and then squish the pellet/s) and then cover with clay to make a bead.  The squishing of cornstarch pellets tends to result in rather organic shapes rather than perfect spheres.  After baking you can flush the cornstarch out of the bead by swishing it around in soapy water, and blowing through the bead to force out any remaining cornstarch.

Eliz
« Last Edit: June 28, 2013, 08:42:36 PM by Elizabeth Campbell »

ejralph

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2013, 12:15:45 PM »
Really useful info there - thanks Elizabeth!

Oh and a dental water pick is REALLY useful for flushing out stuff from hollow beads!

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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Elizabeth Campbell

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2013, 12:31:43 PM »

Oh and a dental water pick is REALLY useful for flushing out stuff from hollow beads!


 :o!!!

 ;D ;D ;D

FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2014, 10:33:22 AM »
Really useful info there - thanks Elizabeth!

Oh and a dental water pick is REALLY useful for flushing out stuff from hollow beads!

Emma

I've got various dental picks, which one is a dental 'water' pick???
FranOnTheEdge

Carrie

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2014, 03:29:10 PM »
Pointed craft tweezers are excellent for getting stuff out of hollow beads  :)

ejralph

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2014, 12:32:03 PM »
Really useful info there - thanks Elizabeth!

Oh and a dental water pick is REALLY useful for flushing out stuff from hollow beads!

Emma

I've got various dental picks, which one is a dental 'water' pick???

It isn't one of the metal tools

A water pick is a rechargeable unit, sort of like an electric toothbrush. Instead of bristles, it has a spout that spurts out a high pressure jet of water you can use to get gunk out from inbetween your teeth

Basically a mini jet wash for your teeth!

Very useful for blasting stuff out of hollow beads though

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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FranOnTheEdge

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2014, 07:53:43 PM »
Oh I see, thanks.  I don't think I can get one of those. Sounds like fun though.
FranOnTheEdge

ejralph

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Re: Clay Mixing
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2014, 10:54:46 AM »
They are readily available from high street chemists, amazon etc. Only downside is they are a tad pricey. Great for your teeth though and if they happen to be useful tools for beads sometimes too, well that makes them a justifyable business expense in my book(s)

Emma
Emma from Sunny Sussex, UK
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